I had a great time with a small local group on a private level I avalanche course this past weekend. It’s not every course that we get the kind of mountain athletes that this group was comprised of, and as a result we were able to access some excellent avalanche terrain in our local backcountry. Excellent terrain with the kind of engaged and bright folks truly made this a great course. At the end of the course all the students were thrilled about the small group atmosphere and are excited to developed their ‘avalanche eyeballs’ right out of the back door.

G3 Onyx Binding

G3 Onyx Binding

Some recent and exciting news for gear heads is the release is G3’s new Onyx Binding. It’s great to have another player in the lightweight ‘tech’ style alpine touring business. I’m really interested to take a look at these (maybe even test them out) sometime in the near future. I really like the idea of having the huge adjustabiility and easy or at least easier way to switch between tour settings. I’m sure that G3’s years of r &d behind this binding have led to a solid contender.

Onto some learning…

Undoubtedly some of you avalanche students that frequent the blog here have heard about the Sparwood/Fernie avalanche accident that occured on December 28th.  A truly tragic scenario, but as with all avalanche incidents there are undoubtedly some things we can learn from this incident to make us more aware backcountry decision makers. Here is a link to the video of one of the survivor’s first hand accounts of the incident.

Yup, pretty heavy stuff- Many Backcountry skiers generalize snowmobilers as ill-prepared, but remember that these guys were all carrying avalanche rescue gear as well as more specialized items like ABS packs and avalungs and were very aware of the avalanche danger at the time of the incident.

Well, I have a few days off before teaching an Ice climbing instructors program for Western State College and an Avy 1 refresher course. Stay tuned for some Ice!

Mike Bromberg

Mike Bromberg